100% Employee Owned, Founded 1954

855.889.0092

100% Employee Owned, Founded 1954

855.889.0092

100% Employee Owned, Founded 1954

855.889.0092

Meinecke Meters – How to Read the Non-Resettable, Totalizing Register

Bill Michie | December 14th, 2016

With the change to the WP/Dynamic Series in 2002, Meinecke introduced a new US Gallon Register that was both long overdue and considerably easier to read than those found on the older WP-QF Series flow meters. Gone were the multiple dials and the confusion that typically came with them. In their place, came a six digit odometer style rolling register and a single dial that rotates 360°.

When combined with the two or three zero’s (00 or 000) printed on the dial face just to the right of the rolling register and the single rotating dial, a 1-1/2″ to 4″ cold water meter has the ability to read up to 99,999,999 gallons cold water meters; Better yet, the 6″, 8″, 10″ and 12″ cold water meters can record flow totals up to 999,999,990.

How to read the US Gallon Register (Cold Water, 1-1/2″ to 4″)

This non-resettable, totalizing register features a six digit, odometer style rolling register, a single red tipped dial indicator and a cog shaped flow indicator. Resolution on this register is 1 gallon.

Meinecke offers two US Gallon registers; The meter pictured to the left is available on 1-1/2″ to 4″ WP/Dynamic Cold Water meters. A similar US Gallon register is offered on 6″, 8″, 10″ and 12″ WP/Dynamic Cold Water meters

To read the register pictured here…

  • US Gallon Registers on the smaller meters feature numeric readings in multiples of 10 gallons; Small hash marks represent one (1) gallon increments, the larger hash marks are located at 5 gallon increments. This gives you a minimum resolution of one (1) gallon on 1-1/2, 2, 3 and 4 inch Cold Water Meters.  
  • Begin by taking note of the 000014 on the rolling register.  
  • Just to right of the 14, you will see 00 (two zeros) painted on the register face representing a factor of x100. If you include them with the 14 on the rolling register, that gives you a starting point of 1,400 gallons.  
  • To that, find the red tip on the rotating dial. On the example shown above, the red tip is located just between the 33 and 34 on the dial. Add that to the 1,400 from the rolling register and you get 1,433.5 gallons. This is the total amount flowed through the meter to date.

How to read the US Gallon Register (Cold Water, 6″, 8″, 10″ & 12″)

To accomodate the higher flows expected on the larger WP/Dynamic Cold Water Turbine Meters, Meinecke added a third zero (000) to the right of the rolling register, effectively giving the reading a factor of x1000.

To Read the Large Meter Register pictured to the left…

  • US Gallon Registers on the larger meters feature numeric readings in multiples of 100; Small hash marks on the dial represent 10 gallon increments, the larger hash marks are located at 50 gallon increments. This gives you a minimum resolution of Ten (10) gallons on 6″, 8″, 10″ and 12″ inch Cold Water Meters.  
  • Begin by taking note of the 000013 on the rolling register.  
  • Just to right of the 13, you will see 000 (three zeros) painted on the register face representing a factor of x1000. When factored with the 13 on the rolling register, that gives you a starting point of 13,000 gallons.  
  • To that, find the red tip on the dial. On the sample register shown above, the red tip is located just above 180. Add that to the 13,000 and you get 13,180 gallons and that’s the total amount flowed through the meter to date.

How to read the US Gallon Register (Hot Water)

The hot water meters include the older style registers that includes a six digit rolling register and two individual dials. Unlike the cold water registers, there are no digits or hash marks placed around the perimeter.

To read this register…

  • First, take note of the multiples that need to factored into each of the three readings. The Rolling Register (odometer) has a factor of x100. The upper dial has a factor of x10 and the lower dial has an assumed factor of x1. 
     
  • Begin by taking note of the 000108 on the rolling register. Multiply that times 100 for a starting point of 10,800 gallons. 
     
  • On the smaller dials, the reading is always taken using the first digit to the left of the dial pointer. On the register above, the x10 dial (just below and to the right of the rolling register) has not yet reached the one (1) so the first digit added to the 10,800 is zero (0). When factored in with the 10,800 reading off the register, the reading remains at 10,800. 
     
  • Next, refer to the reading on the lower dial. In this instance, the dial is between the 8 and 9. Using the same rule of thumb as above, take the lower of the two as your reading. With a factor of times 1 z(x1) on this dial, you simply insert and “8” in place of the zero on the far right of the odometer reading and that gives you a final reading of 10,808 gallons. 

    Technically, the minimum resolution on this register is one (1) gallon. If you wanted to take that one step further, note the position of the dial tip on the lower dial. It’s located just about 3/4’s of the way between the 8 and 9 giving you a final reading of 10,808.75 gallons.

The dial face on new style registers includes several other features worth noting

Low Flow Indicator – Just below and to the left of the dial center, there is a cog shaped wheel who’s sole purpose is that of a simple flow indicator. Any time fluid is passing through the meter, this wheel will turn. This is particularly useful at low flow rates where flow indication is not visible using the rolling register or the red tipped dial indicator.

Pulser Insertion Ports – The register also gives a clear indication of the physical location of the Reed and Opto Pulser installation ports. There are two field selectable Reed Pulser Ports and a single Opto Pulser port. All are located on the cowling that surrounds the register.

Still not sure how to read that register? Contact a Cross instrumentation specialist to learn more or discuss your application!

How to Buy a Flow Meter 

Flow meters come in different styles, technologies, abilities, etc. No one meter that can do everything – but they all have their purpose. Before you can buy with confidence, learn what questions must be answered! 

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